4 Things that your kids need to understand about money

When it comes to our children, we try to do everything that we can to prepare them for the future that we want them to have and most often the future that they want as well. There are four things that your child needs to understand about money and financial wellness. As a parent, it is important that you take the time to go over these four things and help them plan for a solid financial foundation in the future. When you take the time to do this, you are showing your child how to manage their financial wellness at a young age.

Asset and Liabilities

The first thing that you want to go over with them is the difference between an asset and a liability. Assets will put money in their pockets while liabilities will take money out. The more assets that someone has, the better prepared they are when anything takes a hit at their financial foundation. This is a reality that the world is seeing in full color right now with the current pandemic going on. When you teach your child to maintain as many assets as they can you are teaching them the importance of being prepared for whatever it is that the future might bring.

Cashflow and capital gains

The next thing that you want to go over is the difference between cashflow and capital gains. When you invest with the ideal of capital gains, you have no actual control over whether or not things go up or down. When you invest with the purpose of maintaining and building cash flow, you have the benefit of having a long term asset in place that you can have bringing you in funds on a regular basis.

Good debt and bad debt

You also want to discuss with them the difference between good debt and bad debt. Bad debt would fall under things like credit cards, vacations or other mundane things you do not necessarily need. Good debt is found in examples such as rental properties where the tenant would pay your debt for you and grow into long term cash flow. Most good debt like the provision of housing for others can also acquire you some tax breaks as well.

Financial self education

Make sure that your children understand that they need to have their own financial education as well. Having wealth and not understanding that wealth is useless at its core. You never want them to be in a position where they have to rely on other people in order to figure out what they need to do with their own money. When they have the knowledge to know what is best to do with their money, then they can move forward to having a better financial future.

Conclusion

Making sure that your children have a solid foundation for their financial future is important. It is your responsibility to give your best shot at a solid foundation in the future. Take the time to teach your children about financial wellness and they will forever be grateful for it. They will appreciate that you took the time to prepare them for their future.

What Inflation Means, and How It’s Measured

Inflation is pretty simple. It’s the rate at which goods and services increase in value, and in turn, at which the dollar drops in value. For example, your Snickers now costs $2 instead of $1.50, which means your dollar buys less candy bar. Put in another way, your dollar has less value.

The US measures inflation using a metric called the Consumer Price Index, or CPI. The CPI takes a basket of goods and services and averages them out to give you a general idea of how prices are changing. When the CPI goes up, that means inflation is happening.

When inflation is up, we feel the strain. Our dollar buys less and is savings are worthless. That is why you need to invest in assets that hedge inflation.

If your savings plan is to simply to put money into your local bank savings account, you’re actually losing money in times of inflation, because inflation decreases the value of your dollar. The interest your savings are earning won’t be keeping up with inflation, so essentially each month your savings account will buy you less.

I can give you a great example of this. When my parents first got married my father bought a $10,000 life insurance policy for my mom. This was a lot of money back then and would have really helped her if something happened to him. The problem is he didn’t read the fine print that the policy did not increase with inflation and when he passed away a few years ago my mother only received $10,000. Luckily, her children are taking care of her, but that is a perfect example of inflation.

Real estate is a great investment that hedges inflation. Not only does the value of the property rise with inflation, but the amount of tenants pay in rent will follow inflation as well.  These increases let the owner generate income through an investment property and helps them keep pace with the general rise in prices across the economy. To learn more about how to invest in real estate during a downturn click here for access to my private Facebook group.

4 Lessons from Jim Rohn a discussion with Kyle Wilson

Join Ken and he talks with his friend Kyle Wilson. Kyle is the founder of Jim Rohn International, YourSuccessStore.com and KyleWilson.com. He’s worked with the top names in the personal development industry including his 18 year biz partner, friend and mentor Jim Rohn, as well as Og Mandino, Brian Tracy, Les Brown, Darren Hardy, Robin Sharma and many others. Kyle is the author of 52 Lessons I Learned from Jim Rohn and Other Great Legends I Promoted! and partnered with Mark Victor Hansen and Jack Canfield on Chicken Soup for the Entrepreneur’s Soul.

You can learn more about Kyle at his website: www.kylewilson.com

The four lessons that Kyle discusses in the video are:

1. For things to change; you have to change.

2. Success is predictable; find the right blueprint.

3. Be a student not a follower; make sure everything you do is the product of your own conclusions.

4. To be successful you have to bring value to the marketplace; to become wealthy you have to be valuable to valuable people.

Real estate strategies heading into a downturn

Join Ken and Robert Helms for the RealEstateGuysRadio.com podcast as they talk about unique defensive strategies that you can use to mitigate the results of the next downturn – or profit from it.

To get a free copy of Ken’s eBook “21 Keys to Real Estate Success” just visit this link: https://7rxyf2er.pages.infusionsoft.net

Learn more about Ken and sign-up to his video library at: https://kenmcelroy.com/membership-registration/

All About Negative Interest Rates

Many foreign central banks—such as the European Central Bank, the Bank of Japan and the Swiss National Bank—have implemented negative interest rates on bank reserves as a policy tool to stimulate demand for goods and services. If a bank holds a dollar of reserves, the central bank may take, say, half a cent.

The hope is that a negative interest rate will induce firms to lend out the reserves by charging a lower interest rate on loans. In short, “use it or lose it.” More lending would stimulate spending on goods and services, which would lead to higher output and upward pressure on inflation.

Essentially a negative interest rate is just a tax on the banks’ reserves. The tax has to be taken on by someone:

  • The banks can choose not to pass it on and just have lower after-tax profits. This will depress the share price of banks and weaken their balance sheets by having lower equity values.
  • The banks can pass the tax onto depositors by paying a lower interest rate on deposits or charging them fees for holding the deposits. In either case, depositors have less income to spend on goods and services.
  • The bank can pass the tax onto borrowers by charging them a higher interest rate on a loan or higher fees for processing the loan. In either case, it is more costly to finance purchases of goods and services by borrowing.

Please understand Negative interest rates don’t necessarily mean lower interest on loans. That is up to each bank individually, not the Fed.